Reuben Wu : Infinite Sustain

Reuben_Wu_ISO50-2-of-8 Reuben_Wu_ISO50-1-of-8 Reuben_Wu_ISO50-3-of-8 Reuben_Wu_ISO50-5-of-8

Somewhere between 1970s concept album art, expeditionary imagery, and Surrealist painting is where Reuben Wu’s photographs steadfastly sit. His are pictures made in the real world, however, through collapsing time and merging processes, the real is transformed into the surreal, evoking a response simultaneously familiar and foreign. The photographs amplify the strangeness of place and speak to Wu’s individual experience within it.

The remnants of his processes –chemicals dragged arduously across the sensitized paper surface, infrared film shifting the world’s natural hues, light leaking into the camera and hitting the film plane —leave traces of their varied journeys embedded in the final image. Wu’s physical journey is a similar one; he treks with cameras in tow to places that, for most of us, are left to those who fall into the category of “explorer”. Considering the lengths he travels to make his photographs, the unpredictability of Wu’s materials is not exactly what we’d deem trustworthy. The resultant images delineate from the expected photographic trajectory and provide a mode of looking that is equally experiential and aesthetically unique.

Reuben Wu (b. 1975) is a photographer and musician currently living in Chicago, Illinois. He received his MSc in 1998 from the University of Liverpool.

Lot 21 Gallery
933 20th St, San Francisco, California 94107
Thursday, May 22at 6:00pm – 9:00pm

[via ISO50]

Colossi in the Countryside

https://www.lensculture.com/articles/fabrice-fouillet-colossi-in-the-countryside

bf39587ce908aef13025531e969fb0a9-large

Although hugeness is appealing and exhilarating in its own right, I was first intrigued by the human-sized desire behind these gigantic declarations. Then, I asked myself how such works could be connected to their surroundings. How can they fit in the landscapes, despite their excessive dimensions and their necessarily symbolic functions? Fabrice Fouillet 

Eucalyptus deglupta

Eucalyptus deglupta is Gandolf´s favorite tree, commonly known as the rainbow eucalyptus, Mindanao gum, or rainbow gum. It is the only Eucalyptus species found naturally in the Northern Hemisphere. Its natural distribution spans New Britain, New Guinea, Ceram, Sulawesi and Mindanao.

The unique multi-hued bark is the most distinctive feature of the tree. Patches of outer bark are shed annually at different times, showing a bright green inner bark. This then darkens and matures to give blue, purple, orange and then maroon tones.

Tiébélé

tiebele-5[2]

The Kassena of Burkina Faso people build their houses entirely of local materials: earth, wood and straw. Soil mixed with straw and cow dung is moistened to a state of perfect plasticity, to shape almost vertical surfaces.

After construction, the woman makes murals on the walls using colored mud and white chalk. The motifs and symbols are either taken from everyday life, or from religion and belief. Finally, the entire surface is coated with a natural varnish made by boiling pods of néré, the African locust bean tree.  Adding cow dung, compacting layers of mud, burnishing the final layer, and varnishing with néré all make the designs withstand wet weather, enabling the structures to last longer.

 

Corridors of Power

CORRIDORS_OF_POWERa-10

Enormous spaces, endless walkways, wide sluices, cryptic signs; all combined with miles of cables and pipes.

They form a technical universe that radiates a cool logic. A hidden world, known only to a few and yet which has a huge influence on our day to day lives, absolutely essential in fact. Nuclear power plants, coal-fired power stations, storage facilities for nuclear waste and other energy systems can at the same time intimidate and fascinate a visitor.

They seem to have originated from other planets or science-fiction films. Strange worlds, emanating a cool logic; cathedrals of industry, temples of an energy-guzzling society. Energy systems are hidden universes, accessible to very few people, highly protected against accidents and terroristic attacks.

Striking Photos of the Rooms Where VIPs Shape History by Luca Zanier
via Wired and Anzenberger Gallery